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When the sun goes dark: A lesson in superstition

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Hawley, Heather.jpg

While solar eclipses have happened since the beginning of time, there is a little still something ominous about our sun going dark — even if it is only for a few minutes.

When researching Monday’s eclipse for a local story, I ran across some interesting tidbits.

Over the course of our time on this planet, humans have been alternatively amused, puzzled, bewildered and sometimes even terrified at the sight of this celestial phenomenon. Each culture had unique reactions to the solar phenomenon, and as a lover of history, I have to admit I was intrigued.

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