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Archive - Oct 26, 2011

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Rise and fall of William Shirer

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It sat there on your parents’ shelf, or maybe your grandparents’, alongside the six volumes of Winston Churchill’s chronicle of World War II and the 11 volumes of Will and Ariel Durant’s “The Story of Civilization.” It had two distinctions. One was the menacing swastika on the spine of the book. The other was that it was the only one of those 18 volumes that anyone in your family ever actually opened.
It is William L. Shirer’s “The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich,” and more than a million people read it. It may be, aside from the Bible, the biggest book ever read by a big audience, and that audience devoured it, discussed it and was shaped by it. A generation of Americans formed their view of the horrors of Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945 from its pages or from elders or teachers who themselves read it.

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Practice being thankful each day

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Perry, Owen.jpg

The blues ain’t nothin’ but a lonesome man down somewhere in a deep pit, a battered guitar in his hands and a long-gone lover in his heart.
Woman, wife, lover, friend — you are all of these things to me, and more. As the soft moonlight sifting in through open windows falls full upon your calm, sleeping beauty, I lie quietly beside you there for a while, listening to your measured breathing and sensing the strongest heartbeat that keeps you with me, day after precious day. During such moments, I silently thank my God for you —and marvel at the divine wisdom that placed just a wee bit of heaven in my grasp for a little time.

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