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Facebook may have finally hit its peak

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Despite a strong lead in technological communication, the Facebook fad could be heading for a close.

Yes, there is a Golden Globe winning, Oscar-nominated movie, 600 million users and a $50-80 billion corporation involved, but where else can the corporation go from here?

What was once a company that prided itself on the communication between friends and host sometimes-unflattering pictures of each other has turned into a social deviant, being the cause of many personal security issues and now being used as a way to have employees fired.
That’s not all. Facebook allows “exes” to stalk old lovers, gives enemies a portal to cyberbullying and has aided in a number of malicious crimes.

How often have you untagged yourself from pictures or posts out of fear of people you may or may not know knowing your whereabouts and activities?

It is fears like this that have caused Facebook to become more of a menacing upkeep rather than a fun way to waste time.

Of course, there are small security features that Facebook offers that will allow only certain people on certain lists that you create to see what you do, but with the ever-changing Terms of Service, you can never be certain what that list will be able to see after an update, not to mention the upkeep required to know who is on what list and who should be able to see what.
Facebook has become a complex array of services that loses its luminosity and excitement when it becomes too complex, and that is exactly what is happening.

Complexity forced MySpace, Friendster and other less-known social networking sites into near extinction, and unfortunately, Facebook is following the path of its predecessors by taking the fun out of social networking and turning it into a part-time job.

Facebook should look at Twitter and emulate at least the function.

Though 140 characters is a little steep for a post, the simplicity of Twitter is what makes it such an addictive networking site.

Even more trouble for social networking and the Internet as a whole is the literal near-end of space available on the Web.

New York magazine reported that the Internet is running out of addresses for all devices wanting to connect to it. Internet protocol addresses (IPs) are the unique numerical label assigned to every device participating in a computer network.

The system being used now, IPv4, lets 4.3 billion different devices connect to the web. However, with only 117 million device spots left, a new system is needed, which is why the IPv6 is currently in the works.

Among other companies such as Yahoo and Google, Facebook is planning to switch over to the IPv6 in June.

However, I would caution Facebook to hold their cards before folding into the new generation of IP control. The fad is dying fast, and Facebook may not have a leg to stand on when the IPv6 is released worldwide.

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