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What are the indicators of a dead plant?

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Finally, some of us got a rain. I understand some areas got from 1/2 inch to as much as two inches. It is amazing how much difference rain can make in comparison to a sprinkler. The next morning, after my one-inch of rain, my Mexican petunias were standing up straight and blooming. They had had few blossoms that were wilted. Before the rain, my ginger plants had large bud heads but few flowers. After the rain, they were covered with large butterfly blossoms. The fragrance out the back door was outstanding.

The question that is being asked now has been, “What should I do with the plants that show bad drought stress?” Some plants look dead. Some plants have dead limbs. Some plants are badly wilted and have dropped many leaves. Some leaves are just now starting to change color. What should we do?

This goes back to one of the problems with pruning. Every cut should be a decision.

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