SUbscriber Login | NEW SUBSCRIPTION  

So, what exactly is a cane?

  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
in
Liz Graves.jpg

I’ve heard them called “stick,” “pole” and “rod.” But it’s called a “cane,” plain and simple. If you live in Ruston, you’ve probably seen plenty of people walking with long white canes, but you may have some questions about how they can be used by a blind person to safely and effectively navigate through any type of environment.

We use our canes to provide information that our eyes miss, like, for example, a hole in the ground in front of us or a pole that’s in the way. This can be done by touching the object with the cane or, in some cases, by hearing echoes off the object.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share