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Archive - Sep 21, 2010 - Article

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Disturbance causes lockdown at RHS

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Teachers and students at Ruston High School received a scare on Monday morning when the school was placed on lockdown because of a nearby altercation between two men.
Daryl Mitchell, 51, of Cooktown Road, and his neighbor Buddy Barnett, 55, of James Street, were involved in a domestic disturbance at Mitchell’s residence. At this time, no charges have been filed against these individuals.
Lt. Tim Parker, Ruston Police public information officer, said the situation has been handed over to investigators and could result in charges at a later date.

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CTB raises funds for Legacy Park playground

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With the support of Community Trust Bank and the community, Jana Beck is closer to leaving a legacy for Lincoln Parish children — Legacy Park. Beck was recently given a $1,220 check for the boundless playground that will be built at Lincoln Parish Park.
Special features of the boundless playground that will allow all children to play together are handicap ramps, handicap accessible play areas, supportive high-back swings and sensory stations to help with the development of special-needs children.
Caty Jones, marketing coordinator for CTB, said the bank wanted to somehow use their Louisiana Tech University tailgates to benefit the community. The $1,220 donation was gathered from plates of food purchased during the Port City Classic tailgate in Shreveport. Jones said people paid at least $5 for a plate of food.

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RHS at home again Friday

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’Cats to play third straight game at James Stadium
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Ruston High School’s football team isn’t through just yet with its lengthy home stand.
The Bearcats are back at James Stadium again on Friday night.
For the third consecutive week, head coach Billy Laird and company will send their team on to its home turf, this time with a 7 p.m. battle against Sulphur.

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Fitte fits the bill for enthusiasm

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If there is a role model for enthusiasm on Louisiana Tech University’s 2010 football team, look no further than Lyle Fitte.
He could make a born cynic see every glass as full.
Fitte was the hit at the Bulldogs’ weekly media luncheon on Monday, delivering a “better things to come” speech laced with his own positive outlook on how this season could eventually turn out for a team that will carry a 1-2 record into a Saturday home game (6 p.m.) against the University of Southern Mississippi.

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Compost: Another way to go green

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It’s about that time of the year to dust off the rakes and begin cleaning up all the leaves that fall from our trees. As we drive around, we’ll see people burning and bagging tons of leaves and sticks from their yards. It wouldn’t take much effort at all to turn those leaves into nutrient-filled compost to use in our gardens and flower beds.
Compost can improve aeration of soil, root penetration and water infiltration. It can make clay soils easier to work and helps sandy soils retain more water. Plus it’s an environmentally sound practice in that it keeps the bags of leaves out of the landfill.
There are many different types of composters that can help you create this very valuable product. Of course there are composters that can be purchased from many home and garden centers. However, for the true do it yourself person there are those that you can create yourself. The simplest and most inexpensive thing you can do is just make a pile in your backyard. This works well enough if you don’t mind the appearance of an uncontained compost mound in your yard. Just find a good location and pile your yard waste in a mound about three feet by three feet by three feet. Then cover the pile with a layer of soil — it will keep moisture for the microorganisms and soil animals working to make compost.

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Court opens with reflection

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Last week your writer was privileged to have been part of a ceremony that affected not only my business, if you will, but our way of life here. The ceremony, sponsored by the Lincoln Parish Bar Association, took less than an hour, but it was reflective of the honor, capabilities and integrity of our profession here as well as the people we represent.
I thought I would share some of the joy with you my favorite readers. In the event that one is reading this for the first time, let me make a short reference to my job, or at least my “daytime” job: I am a lawyer. I am proud of that. Now from time to time in this column, I have poked a little fun at my profession; this has caused me to be criticized by some of my colleagues. I have also written some complimentary remarks about some of the courageous achievements and positions of other attorneys and judges, and for this, I have been criticized by some in the public. But all of this goes along with freedom of speech and freedom of the press. If one writes a word in public, he should be prepared to have a comment hurled back, and I can handle that. So, if this week’s views are too “nice” toward the legal profession and one takes umbrage at that, well, so be it.
Every court in this state, as do we here, has a “fall opening” of court. This traditionally takes place at the beginning of September during a regular court session. Here in Lincoln Parish, we have observed the opening of court at the time of the impaneling of the Grand Jury. Historically, this time of year has as part of its roots the fact that court used to be closed for the entirety of the summer. Kind of like the schools, the courtrooms did not have air conditioning, so business shut down.

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State lowers blood donation age to 16 years

Someone needs a blood transfusion every two seconds, America’s Blood Centers reports.
That someone could be you or a loved one. That’s why it’s important to give blood.
Recently, the state of Louisiana changed its criteria for blood donors, lowering the age from 17 to 16. Sixteen-year-old donors must have consent from a parent and valid identification, but a parent does not have to be present. Donors must also weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health.

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