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Archive - May 6, 2006 - Archive

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Is Ruston clean enough?

“In the district competition, we just competed with cities of our population size in that district,” Simpson said. “In the state, it will be the cities of the same population size in the state.”
Garden clubs around the state sponsor the contest, but, Simpson said, each city has to agree to participate.
“Since 1958, Louisiana’s garden clubs have sponsored an annual statewide Cleanest City contest,” she said. “The purpose of the contest is to develop civic pride in citizens, take care of the environment and make our cities look presentable.”

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Gilbert’s work more than ‘academic’

Several phone book messages sit taped to her desk.
For Stacy Gilbert, assistant athletics director for academics, it’s a never-ending ‘job.’
“The people who work in Tech Athletics want to see success so much that they don’t just stick to the job description,” Gilbert said. “I don’t know anyone here who just works from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.”
But for Gilbert, better known to everyone as Stacy, it’s anything but a simple job, and she wouldn’t trade it for the world.
“I’ve never dreaded coming to work. I’ve enjoyed it every day for the past 10 years,” she said. “And I still love it.”

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Jurors need to do what’s right

Taxpayers currently pay 100 percent of the insurance premiums for retired and current jurors and 50 percent of their families’ premiums. At this time six current and six retired police jurors participate.
In justifying his decision to vote against changes that would require Jury employees to pay 10 percent of their premiums and jurors — both active and retired — to pay 100 percent of their premiums, Jury President the Rev. Eddie Allen compared Jury service to military service. He insinuated that since jurors are “serving the people” then they are just like soldiers serving their

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Jury has chance to set example

Based on the recommendation of an insurance consultant, the draft says “Elected Police Jurors beginning on January 1, 2008, may participate in the group medical, dental and life benefits, but will be required to pay 100 percent of the premium associated with the coverage.”
For the six jurors who participate in the benefits — Terry Knowles, Jody Backus, Joe Henderson, Roy Glover, Charles Owens and David Hammons — the Jury pays premiums of $61,869.84 annually.

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Giddyup: Equine sale kicks off at Tech Farm

He said the money would be used to buy supplies, maintain the animals, help buy new animals or new bloodlines and other items the program may need.
With 61 animals up for auction — including show lambs and goat prospects, finished steers, hogs and lambs, commercial Brangus heifers, black Angus bulls and horses — Kennedy and the others involved in the auction expect a very successful year.
“We’ll have more animals than we’ve had in the last 10 years or so,” Kennedy said. “We’re selling more animals than we have in the past.”

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