SUbscriber Login | NEW SUBSCRIPTION  

Archive - May 2012

  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.

May 26th

Public invited to exhibit at museum

in

Kelly Fearing grew up on Minden Street in Ruston. He attended Ruston High School, and he graduated from Louisiana Tech. He continued his study of art at Columbia University in New York City. All who associated with him knew that he would be a force in the world of art. His superior talent was not a secret in his many artistic endeavors.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share

Resident: Radically shrink government

in

Benjamin Franklin wrote, “... two passions which have influenced in the affairs of men ... ambition and avarice ... Place before such men a post of honor, that shall at the same time be a place of profit, and they will move heaven and earth to obtain it.”  

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share

Those who paid the greatest price

in
Bleich, Joe C.jpg

During the wintry, polar-like months of 1944-45, he lay on a frozen branch as his blood flowed ever so slowly from his side. His unit had gone ahead. They did not know he had just been struck by a German bullet. When he fell on the snow it had been white; it now turned red with his blood. There was no relief in sight. The wound was going to be fatal if left untreated, and there was no one around. In the temperatures that had sometimes gone to 20 degrees below zero during the Battle of the Bulge, he shivered as a different feeling of cold came over him.  He knew he would not be rescued. He prayed. He knew he was going to die very soon on that lonely, icy battlefield in the middle of nowhere. His thoughts of his life collectively, swiftly and clearly passed before his eyes.  He wanted to say “goodbye” to so many.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share

Adopt-A-School awards honor partners

in
8-1.jpg

The Lincoln Parish Adopt-A-School Program recently wrapped up another record-breaking year during its Fourth Annual End-of-Year Celebration and Luncheon. Co-Sponsored by the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce and Lincoln ACHIEVE, the event was attended by roughly 120 Chamber and Education partners who participated throughout the 2011-12 year. 
Highlights of the event included a recap of its successful community service projects, which included raising more than $12,000 for Komen for the Cure, breaking its own record for a single-day contribution to the food pantry at Christian Community Action and showcasing its third “Go GREEN!” project with 13 schools participating in the Community wide Clean up Day and sponsoring green initiatives on their respective campuses.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share

Tech professor honored for ‘product of the year’

in

Erez Allouche, associate professor of civil engineering and director of the Trenchless Technology Center at Louisiana Tech University, has won Technology Product of the Year honors from the Louisiana Technology Council (LTC) and the North Louisiana Economic Partnership (NLEP) for his innovative, “green” geopolymer concrete technology.
Allouche received the “eWARD” for the Shreveport/Bossier City Northern Louisiana region during a ceremony sponsored by CenturyLink.  eWARDS is a cooperative program designed to recognize the technological achievements of Louisiana’s top companies, organizations and individuals. Organizers say eWARDS is a celebration of innovation and achievement for those in the community that have made a positive impact in the technology industry over the past year.
“The HTGeopolymer project would never have reached its advanced development level without the support of our regional, national and international partners,” said Allouche.  “I would like to thank Cleco Power, NASA’s Stennis Space Center, M.L. Smith and the many other private entities and government agencies that supported the development and demonstration of this novel technology over the years.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share

Tech wins 22 LPW awards

in

Faculty and staff in Louisiana Tech’s department of journalism received 22 awards from the Louisiana Press Women’s Communication Contest, including 16 first-place awards.
The first-place awards will go on to the national competition, which will be judged in May.
Students who placed are as follows:

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share

Hope Center wins $25K grant

in

After three weeks and more than 1.2 million votes, State Farm® is pleased to announce Ruston’s Hope Center for Autism will receive a $25,000 grant to provide more help to those families working with autism. The local non profit was one of 3,000 cause submissions State Farm received through “Cause An Effect,” a population-sourced philanthropic initiative that relies on non profit organizations to create solutions to community issues.
 State Farm officials credited Tiffany White of Ruston for leading the charge and coordinating the successful effort to win the grant.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share

The building blocks of an investment portfolio

in
Conville, Bobby.jpg

Opening a savings account with your local bank may provide an easy way to put money away for safekeeping, but the thought of doing more can be tempting. 
While your money will earn a small rate of interest with a savings account, you may want to consider an “investing” program that can potentially earn more from the money you put away. 
If investing is something that piques your interest, but you’re not quite sure where to begin, consider two of the most basic types of investments — stocks and bonds.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share

Gen X’ers must juggle many financial issues

in
Fallin, Randy.jpg

If you’re part of “Generation X” — the age cohort born between the mid-1960s and the early 1980s — you’re probably in one of the busiest phases of your life, as you’re well into your working years and, at the same time, busy raising a family.
But just as you’re “multi-tasking” in your life, you’ll also need to address multiple financial goals.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share

With life transitions, always learn to expect the unexpected

in
Moore, Byron.jpg

Question: I have enough money saved for my child’s college education and I think I’m on track for saving up for retirement. What else do I need to worry about?
 
Answer: Life.
People usually think about financial matters and seek advice when they anticipate going through a life transition. You mentioned two classic transitions: the college education of a child and your own retirement.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share